Advertising Regulation

One of the biggest misconceptions among public health advocates and policymakers alike is that the free speech clause of the First Amendment is an insurmountable barrier to regulating harmful marketing practices. This talking point is regularly deployed by the food industry to scare government officials. While it’s true the Constitution protects advertising to some extent, it does not give corporations free reign to market anything, anywhere, anytime.

Eat Drink Politics can help you navigate the legal landscape of the First Amendment to propose viable policy solutions. Numerous options exist, especially at the local level, to restrict junk food marketing.

RECENT BLOG POSTS

USDA’s Proposal on Food Marketing in Schools Could Harm Children

Today, on behalf of Corporate Accountability International and in collaboration with the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, I submitted the following comments to the U.S. Department of Agriculture regarding its proposal to require schools to only allow marketing for those foods allowed under the agency’s “Smart Snacks” nutrition guidelines. (See also the excellent comments submitted [...]

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Big Food defies first lady with own nutrition label

Last week, with an assist from first lady Michelle Obama, the Food and Drug Administration announced a set of proposed improvements — the first in 20 years — to the nutrition facts label found on most food packages. Read rest at Al Jazeera America …

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Holding Big Food Accountable for False Claims of Responsible Marketing to Children

by Michele Simon and Cara Wilking Looking back at 2013, while the food movement made progress in certain areas (such as school food and GMO labeling), when it comes to exploitative food marketing to children meaningful change remains elusive. Let’s Move director and White House chef Sam Kass recently acknowledged the obvious when he said [...]

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Is the End of “Natural” Labeling Near?

This article of mine originally appeared in print in Functional Ingredients magazine and is available online for registered users at New Hope here. See other posts on this subject here and here. Last year in this space I asked if it was time for the Food and Drug Administration to define how food makers can [...]

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Industry Lawyers Tell Big Food How Not to Get Sued

Last week I attended a conference in Washington DC with the lofty title: “3rd Advanced Regulatory and Compliance Summit on Food & Beverage Marketing & Advertising.” The event’s main sponsor was the law firm of Faegre Baker Daniels, whose numerous mega-corporate food clients include Cargill, Dean Foods, and Nestlé. In addition, the firm represents (under [...]

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Contact Michele Simon: michele@eatdrinkpolitics.com

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